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The adrenal glands of a deer mouse (left) and oldfield mouse (right), showing the relative size of the zona fasciculata (green) and the novel zona inaudita (red). (Credit: Bendesky lab/Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute).

News from about

Tools & Technology June 21, 2016

How are Adult and Newborn Mouse Brains Different?

Findings reveal mismatch between neuronal activity and blood flow in the brains of newborn mice, shedding new light on how the growing brain feeds itself

Decision Making June 10, 2016

Philosophers, Brain and Mind Scientists Discuss Search for the Self

The World Science Festival concluded by addressing one of the hardest questions in science: How do our brains give rise to our sense of self?

Movement May 27, 2016

Tracing the Steps that Guide Movement

For Richard Mann, answers to some of biology’s biggest puzzles, such as how our brains direct our muscles to move, can be found in the tiniest of places.

Franck Polleux Wins Prize for Outstanding Contributions to Neuroscience

Award recognizes Dr. Polleux’s groundbreaking research to map the brain’s wiring, lending insight into human cognition and our susceptibility to disease.

Charting the Growth of Brain Cells’ Branches

In his research, Wesley Grueber asks: How do cells know how and where to spread their tendrils?

Decision Making May 3, 2016

Finding the Beats in our Brains

What happens in the brain of a jazz musician when he or she plays a tune — and what happens in the brains of audience members when they hear it.

The Senses April 25, 2016

Locating the Brain’s Motion Detectors

At Columbia's Zuckerman Institute, Rudy Behnia asks: How does the visual system perceive movement?

Computation March 22, 2016

Teasing Signals from the Brain

Statistician John Cunningham examines how the complex communication between motor neurons gives rise to the elegant simplicity of our movements.

Tools & Technology March 15, 2016

Building the Tools to Reveal the Invisible

How a ‘hack’ to a high-powered microscope — and an innovative statistical technique — stands to change what we see when we peer inside the brain.

Zuckerman Institute In the News

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