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Evolution

How Animals Left the Sea and Evolved to Walk on Land

From the lab of Thomas M. Jessell, PhD, Columbia's Zuckerman Institute

Partially overlapping expression of three transcription factors in from thoracic region of mouse spinal cord (Credit: Lora Sweeney/Jessell and Kintner Labs/Salk Institute)

News from about

Evolution January 11, 2018

How Animals Left the Sea and Evolved to Walk on Land

By classifying different types of cells in the spinal cord, neuroscientists have gained new insight into an evolutionary achievement millions of years in the making.

Growth & Development December 1, 2017

Mapping the Many Steps it Takes to Build a Cell

In developing a new tool to trace the proteins that guide cellular development, Columbia scientists are deciphering one of biology’s most ancient systems.

The Senses November 20, 2017

Thanksgiving: The Brain Science of Taste

For neuroscientists, the secret to a perfect Thanksgiving turkey isn't just the seasoning and stuffing. Instead, taste is in the brain. Please join neuroscientist Charles S. Zuker, PhD, for a flavor of the cutting edge of taste science today.

Evolution November 2, 2017

What the Discovery of an Elusive Protein Means for Science and Medicine

Columbia-led research solves decade-long scientific mystery; lays groundwork for entirely new investigations into cell biology and disease

Movement October 20, 2017

BRAIN Initiative Awards $25.1M to Zuckerman Institute Scientists

Series of awards unites experts from different fields and universities; bolsters innovative, team approach to deciphering the complexities of the brain.

Disease October 16, 2017

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Taps Columbia Scientists to Build Spinal Cord Atlas

Single-cell atlas will serve to guide precise strategies for understanding and treating spinal-cord disease and injury, and is part of Initiative’s larger Human Cell Atlas project.

Computation October 9, 2017

The Human Brain Recalls Visual Features in Reverse Order Than It Detects Them

This new study upends models of how the brain constructs interpretations of the outside world. The research could shed light on phenomena ranging from eyewitness testimony to stereotyping to autism.

Disease September 13, 2017

Could the Body’s Own Defense Against ALS Actually Drive Disease Progression?

A new study in mice reveals that one of the body’s natural defenses against ALS suppresses disease progression early on, but in later stages advances the disease’s deadly spread through the spinal cord.

Disease September 4, 2017

The Mystery Behind Schizophrenia's Most Stubborn Symptom

New study in mice reveals biological origins of memory deficits, a core symptom of schizophrenia.

The Senses August 31, 2017

How Does Rafael Nadal Keep His Eye on the Ball? The Neuroscience of Vision

In celebration of the 2017 US Open, Columbia's Zuckerman Institute presents a piece that explores the minds behind the talents. Join us for a tour led by neuroscientist Rudy Behnia, PhD, an expert in vision at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute.