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Could the Body’s Own Defense Against ALS Actually Drive Disease Progression?

From the lab of Tom Maniatis, PhD, Columbia's Zuckerman Institute

Differences in disease progression in spinal interneurons, a type of nerve cell that generally succumbs to ALS in later stages of disease. Left: Normal ALS models, showing protein aggregation (red/green) in spinal interneurons. Right: autophagy-suppressed ALS models, showing virtually no aggregation (Credit: Tom Maniatis/Columbia's Zuckerman Institute).

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The Senses August 31, 2017

How Does Rafael Nadal Keep His Eye on the Ball? The Neuroscience of Vision

In celebration of the 2017 US Open, Columbia's Zuckerman Institute presents a piece that explores the minds behind the talents. Join us for a tour led by neuroscientist Rudy Behnia, PhD, an expert in vision at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute.

The Senses August 9, 2017

How the Tongue Keeps Its Tastes Straight

Signals sent by tongue’s taste cells prevent the brain from confusing bitter and sweet tastes.

The Senses May 22, 2017

How the Brain Turns Down the Volume on Your Noisy Body

A Q&A with Nathaniel Sawtell, PhD

The Senses January 26, 2017

Jeff Koons First Artist-in-Residence at Zuckerman Institute

Though artists and scientists may sometimes speak different languages, there is much they can learn from each other.

The Senses September 22, 2016

Columbia Neuroscientist Wins Support of Leading Science Institute

Stavros Lomvardas, an expert on olfaction, our sense of smell, earns funding and recognition from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

The Senses September 6, 2016

Columbia’s Carol Mason Wins Vision Award for Studies of How Visual Circuits Develop

Prize recognizes decades of work that explores how the eyes connect to the brain and lays the groundwork for new ways to treat vision damage.

The Senses July 25, 2016

Seeing with Both Sides of the Brain

In her research, Carol Mason asks: How do nerve cells in the eye know where to go in the brain?

The Senses July 12, 2016

A Researcher Comes Face-to-Face with Sight

Ning Qian is exploring how the brain makes sense of the world we see, as well as why people with autism often find it difficult to look at faces.

The Senses April 25, 2016

Locating the Brain’s Motion Detectors

At Columbia's Zuckerman Institute, Rudy Behnia asks: How does the visual system perceive movement?

The Senses November 18, 2015

Scientists Turn Tastes On and Off by Activating and Silencing Brain Cells

New study proves that sense of taste is hardwired in the brain, independent of learning or experience