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Learning & Memory

Brain Area Controlling Social Memory Also Triggers Aggression

From the lab of Steven A. Siegelbaum, PhD, Columbia's Zuckerman Institute

Composite image of neurons in the CA2 hippocampal region of a mouse (Felix Leroy and David H. Brann/Siegelbaum lab/Columbia's Zuckerman Institute).

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Learning & Memory December 5, 2018

Brain Area Controlling Social Memory Also Triggers Aggression

Columbia study in mice reveals importance of memory in driving key social behavior; offers insight into psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

Disease October 24, 2018

How Columbia University is Untangling Alzheimer's Disease

Meet the scientists leveraging technological advances to reveal aspects of the disease long hidden from view.

Disease October 23, 2018

How to Reverse Memory Loss in Old Mice

Columbia scientists reveal new details of how a naturally occurring hormone can boost memory in aging mice, laying the groundwork for staving off this form of memory loss in people.

Disease October 10, 2018

Columbia Scientist Awarded $7.8M to Identify New Targets Against Brain Disease

By determining the molecular signatures of Alzheimer’s, CTE and other conditions, Anthony Fitzpatrick and his research team to pave way for treatments that target hallmarks of neurodegenerative disease.

The Senses May 24, 2018

Carol Mason Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Academy recognizes decades of work to map complex pathways that connect the eye to the brain; research that could inform treatments of developmental and vision disorders.

Learning & Memory March 1, 2018

In Pursuit of Pleasure, Brain Learns to Hit the Repeat Button

New study in mice shows how the brain learns to reproduce patterns of brain activity that lead to reward; provides insights for treating addiction and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Disease January 31, 2018

Body Movements Just Need a “Puff” of Dopamine to Get Started

A new study in mice suggests that a burst of dopamine levels at the beginning of a movement only, as opposed to all the time, is what gets us going. This may have important implications for treating Parkinson’s disease.

Movement October 20, 2017

BRAIN Initiative Awards $25.1M to Zuckerman Institute Scientists

Series of awards unites experts from different fields and universities; bolsters innovative, team approach to deciphering the complexities of the brain.

Disease October 16, 2017

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Taps Columbia Scientists to Build Spinal Cord Atlas

Single-cell atlas will serve to guide precise strategies for understanding and treating spinal-cord disease and injury, and is part of Initiative’s larger Human Cell Atlas project.

Disease September 13, 2017

Could the Body’s Own Defense Against ALS Actually Drive Disease Progression?

A new study in mice reveals that one of the body’s natural defenses against ALS suppresses disease progression early on, but in later stages advances the disease’s deadly spread through the spinal cord.