Columbia University in the City of New York

BrainSTEM in Action

Teacher professional development (Credit: Lou Rocco for Columbia's Zuckerman Institute)

Chancellor’s Day Professional Development


*New workshop*
Neuroscience of Anxiety: STEM learning to promote social-emotional growth

*** APPLY NOW ***

 

Join us on Chancellor’s Day, June 9, 2022 at the Zuckerman Institute for a day of professional development for New York City high-school teachers. The topic will focus on the neuroscience of anxiety in STEM learning, and teachers will have the option to engage in observational and experiential activities. 

 

Participants have two options for joining:

 

Option 1 - Morning only

  • Free workshop - Teachers will tour the Zuckerman Institute’s fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) research facility, examine brain scan data, and discuss neuroscience studies exploring math anxiety and fear.
    Duration: 9:00-11:30am

Workshop size: 32

 

Option 2 - Full day

  • Paid workshop - Teachers will complete the morning workshop, and in the afternoon, they will apply insights from the morning to customize a lesson based on the neuroscience of anxiety for their class, work with other teachers to devise new educational material, and practice delivering their lesson.
    Duration: 9:00-4:00pm
    Workshop size: 16

Compensation: $300 per teacher

 

Additional details

 

This professional development opportunity is open to all teachers in New York City. Only teachers participating in the full day will receive $300 as compensation for the day. 

 

The day begins at 9:00am with light refreshments. Lunch for all teachers will be provided from 11:30am-1:00pm.

 

The workshop will take place at the Jerome L. Greene Science Center (605 W. 129th St, New York, NY 10027) in the Education Lab. Proof of vaccination is required for this workshop. 

 

Apply here by 9 am on May 20. Decisions will be sent on May 25.

 

Preference will be given to:

  • Teachers at schools located in Upper Manhattan and South Bronx
  • Teachers from Title 1 schools 
  • High-school STEM teachers
  • Teachers who see themselves directly using this material in their classroom