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October 13, 2016 — Columbia’s Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute and BioBus announce today a partnership aimed at bringing new educational opportunities to schools and community centers across upper Manhattan and the Bronx.

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October 11, 2016 — Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger today announced that two Columbia University Medical Center doctors will lead a new community Wellness Center, located in the Jerome L. Greene Science Center on the University’s new Manhattanville campus. Neurologist Olajide Williams, MD, and psychiatrist Sidney Hankerson, MD, are known for their pioneering approaches to improving public health in Harlem and Washington Heights. The Wellness Center will operate with support from Columbia’s Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute.

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October 5, 2016 — Zuckerman Institute Principal Investigator Daphna Shohamy, PhD, and her team have uncovered a unique feature of the adolescent brain that enriches teens’ ability to learn and form memories: the coordinated activity of two distinct brain regions. This observation, which stands in contrast to the adult brain, may be related to teens’ oft-derided affinity for reward-seeking behavior. These findings suggest that such behavior is not necessarily detrimental, but instead may be a critical feature of adolescence and the maturing brain.

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October 4, 2016 — Schizophrenia affects millions of people worldwide, and yet we understand so little about the disease. Joseph Gogos, MD, PhD, a neuroscientist at Columbia’s Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute and a professor at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) studies schizophrenia’s biological origins. Dr. Gogos has co-authored a new paper, published today in Cell Reports, that sheds light on how a genetic change alters healthy brain function in a mouse model of schizophrenia.

We spoke with Dr. Gogos about what his latest research has revealed, what it could mean for the many people suffering from the disease, and whether it could point to new pharmacological treatments.

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October 3, 2016 — Columbia scientists have developed a new mathematical model that helps to explain how the human brain’s biological complexity allows it to lay down new memories without wiping out old ones — illustrating how the brain maintains the fidelity of memories for years, decades or even a lifetime. This model, developed in the laboratory of Zuckerman Institute Principal Investigator Stefano Fusi, PhD, could help neuroscientists design more targeted studies of memory, and also spur advances in neuromorphic hardware — powerful computing systems inspired by the human brain.

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