News

News

November 17, 2016 — The Society for Neuroscience honored Thomas M. Jessell, PhD, with its highest award, reserved for scientists whose outstanding research has advanced the entire field. Dr. Jessell, a world expert in the neuroscience of movement and a codirector of Columbia’s Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, accepted the prize on Sunday at the Society’s annual meeting in San Diego.

More

November 8, 2016 — Leica Microsystems CMS GmbH has entered into an exclusive, worldwide licensing agreement with Columbia University in New York to commercialize SCAPE microscopy for Life Science applications. SCAPE (swept confocally aligned planar excitation) microscopy forms 3D images of living samples by scanning them with a sheet of laser light. Developed by Zuckerman Institute Principal Investigator Elizabeth Hillman, PhD, SCAPE’s unique capabilities allow scientists to perform fundamentally new kinds of experiments, from imaging individual neurons firing throughout the brain of adult fruit flies, to tracking calcium waves through cells in the beating heart of a zebrafish. SCAPE also stands to create new inroads for understanding diseases such as cancer, and for the development of new drugs and therapies.

More

October 13, 2016 — Columbia’s Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute and BioBus announce today a partnership aimed at bringing new educational opportunities to schools and community centers across upper Manhattan and the Bronx.

More

October 11, 2016 — Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger today announced that two Columbia University Medical Center doctors will lead a new community Wellness Center, located in the Jerome L. Greene Science Center on the University’s new Manhattanville campus. Neurologist Olajide Williams, MD, and psychiatrist Sidney Hankerson, MD, are known for their pioneering approaches to improving public health in Harlem and Washington Heights. The Wellness Center will operate with support from Columbia’s Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute.

More

October 5, 2016 — Zuckerman Institute Principal Investigator Daphna Shohamy, PhD, and her team have uncovered a unique feature of the adolescent brain that enriches teens’ ability to learn and form memories: the coordinated activity of two distinct brain regions. This observation, which stands in contrast to the adult brain, may be related to teens’ oft-derided affinity for reward-seeking behavior. These findings suggest that such behavior is not necessarily detrimental, but instead may be a critical feature of adolescence and the maturing brain.

More